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Sunday, 17 July 2011

Lessons Learned

Early last year I started working on a turn-of-the-century novel about the fae, and heroes, and magic and all kinds of things. I got really excited about it, as I always do with new projects, banging out five or six chapters in a week or so. Then, as I always do, I ran out of fuel and put it to one side, knowing that I'd come back to it at some point.

This is the way I always work. I get a few chapters down, a loose idea of where the story is going, and then I let it stew. At some point - maybe a year later, maybe five years later - my short stories will start touching back on the themes and characters in that fragment of a novel, and I know it's time to go back to it. Now is that time with the faerie story.

Unfortunately, this time I've encountered a problem with that. When I was writing those first few chapters I decided to set up some Photoshop templates to format the text exactly as I'd like it to appear in a printed book, with nice typesetting and illuminated lettering at the beginning of chapters and all that jazz. It also turned off the wiggly-line corrections and word count distractions that are part and parcel of writing in word processing software. I thought it would boost my productivity, and it did.

The problem is, when I rendered the pages into PDF files to send to people and print them off for myself, I rasterized all the type. The settings in the PDF files meant that the text couldn't be copied and pasted; that wasn't intentional, I just left the settings at their default status. Unfortunately, what I need to be able to do right now is copy everything I've written already into a Word document.

Guess what I can't do?

Lesson; always keep an editable version of your writing. Always.

2 comments:

  1. The medical school personal statement is just one part of your entire medical school application. Your GPA, MCAT, extracurricular activities, letters of recommendation and interview make up the rest. See more amcas personal statement length

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  2. Great story and sad lesson hehe
    For me, as for one of professional writers, thie article wasn't very useful, still I like your style and the author's manner. Great!

    P.S.: remember, kids: PDF can't go alone, ALWAYS leave an editable copy of it in .pages or in .doc/x!

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